A Liquid Top Ten (2020, Film Edition)

Much like my previous, similar post to this one, I want this list to change whenever I come back to it 🙂

Also like my last post, there’s no special reason to do this really – but it serves two purposes for me; Self-Reflection and Fun. I do think that as bloggers and audiences we tend to crave the act of listing, of categorising and ranking, so I’m giving in to that need once again today!

And yes! The copying from my other post continues below, but with minor tweaks:

  • I’m focusing on films today
  • This list should change as I see more texts over the years and it will definitely reveal gaps in my knowledge
  • Equally, it should also change whenever I re-watch and re-evaluate
  • By definition of the list being ‘mine’ it clearly reveals my biases and interests
  • Expect to still see the 1990/2000s heavily represented, lol
  • Subsequent posts will maybe be shorter than this one

Onward to the list!

Let’s climb from the bottom up:

10. Redline (2009)

For my number ten I’ve gone with a film where almost the whole reason it’s here is due to the visuals. The storyline or character aspects are not bad – at all – but I think this is one film that you can appreciate on the art and animation alone. Boy, it is fantastic and still stands out style-wise, in the anime industry, with its heavy use of Dick Tracy kinda shadow.

9. Sword of the Stranger (2007)

This is a film that I hadn’t seen until quite recently and it shot into this list in part because I do really enjoy historical and also samurai anime, and upon reflection I think this one holds up better in some aspects compared to a classic I nearly included – Ninja Scroll. Sword of the Stranger has some superb fight sequences and great scene-setting too. Very much worth it if you’ve never seen this and you like the genre.

8. Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust (2000)

Perhaps the first Vampire Hunter D is maybe more ‘important’ to anime in general (or at least certain genres) and in some ways I prefer the 1985 film to Bloodlust but maybe this one sneaks into the top ten due to the higher production budget. The story’s great too; it’s creepy without being crass and the visuals really are memorable. This is one that I’ve already reviewed (like at least half this list I think).

7. Paprika (2006)

As you’ll soon see, I’ve got a couple of repeat directors in this list, which shows that I’ve struggled to choose between two or more of their works… or that I need to see more films. But I couldn’t leave Paprika off this list – it’s influential and mesmerizing. Aside from the thriller storyline and great animation, there’s a lot of fun references throughout that rewarded me on nearly each re-watch.

6. Howl’s Moving Castle (2005)

I could have put a few of the big Ghibli films here – obviously Spirited Away is a landmark and I also love Whisper of the Heart, but I think Howl’s is a fantastic adaptation of an already fantastic book. It’s got all the classic Ghibli features to be expected from a Miyazaki film too and my favourite Joe Hisaishi score.   

5. Summer Wars (2010)

I’ve mentioned before how much I like the pairing of Hosoda and Okudera and I feel like this is their best work together. It’s fantastic that such a large cast works, with time enough to get a feel for even most of the minor characters here. To me, this has that adventure feel – even though the setting is (at least in one sense) limited to one homestead.

4. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind (1984)

This is my favourite Ghibli film and it’s technically not a Ghibli film, I guess! I believe it’s easy to make a convincing argument that Princess Mononoke is a better execution of the same themes that appear in Nausicaa but I have a soft spot for this one. Since I’ve reviewed it here, I won’t ramble on too much more 🙂

3. Perfect Blue (1997)

I found myself having trouble placing some films above or below others, due to the implications of ‘quality’ that any hierarchy creates, but again, this is a personal fav list and as much as I love Nausicaa, I think Perfect Blue is too hard to place lower for me. This film is a harrowing psychological thriller executed so, so well. I seem to remember over the years, occasional calls along the lines of ‘why wasn’t this a live-action film’ and sure, it’d work… but I don’t like the implication behind the question: that animation was the lesser form for this story.

2. Akira (1988)

I know Akira tops a lot of lists and it should be abundantly clear why. It’s probably here at number two in my list because cyberpunk is one of my fav genres. Akira is a monster of a film, from its huge budget (esp for the time) and the staggering number of cells 160,000+ to the length and scope of the story. For me and many folks the world-building is another key draw; the setting is so immersive.

1. Ghost in the Shell (1995)

So, no surprises for the top of the list! Ghost in the Shell feels like it’ll be a film that remains enshrined for many more decades still, possibly in part because it’s a great mix of ‘high concept’ and grittier genre elements? I love that the structure is basically 3 or 4 action sequences with the rest being divided between dialogue and atmosphere. I probably watch this once a year and it’s always enthralling to me.


The Current List

Ghost in the Shell (1995)
Akira (1988)
Perfect Blue (1997)
Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind (1984)
Summer Wars (2010)
Howl’s Moving Castle (2005)
Paprika (2006)
Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust (2000)
Sword of the Stranger (2007)
Redline (2009)


Down a little further are a few films that could have made it into my list but got close enough.

Next quarter, maybe I’ll have seen a few more films and also, been able to decide whether I should have a Shinkai film in there!

Venus Wars (1989)
Whisper of the Heart (1995)
Girl who Leapt Through Time (2006)
Endless Waltz (1997)
Grave of the Fireflies (1988)
Ninja Scroll (1993)
A Tree of Palme (2002)


Again, like last time, let me know if you think I’ve missed something stellar (spoiler: I have) and maybe I’ll be able to include it in my upcoming watching if it’s within my reach, both figuratively and literally.

Thanks for reading!

7 thoughts on “A Liquid Top Ten (2020, Film Edition)

    • Thanks! Isn’t it awesome? It’s got a great escalation of stakes and what I like to think of the Miyazaki trademark of ‘solve problems with kindness’ that he uses every now and then.

      Agreed; I really need to watch some more too but they seem to made less and less (or they just never come anywhere near my cinema)

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Nausicaa is my favourite Miyazaki movie, although there are better in terms of animation and even imagination. There is just a specific feel to it. Ghost in the Shell is on the top for me as well. I am a big fan of Mamoru Oshii and his work, even non-anime ones. Have you seen the magnificent “Avalon” or the surrealist trip “Red Spectacles”?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Nausicaa fans unite 🙂

      It’s just so hard for me to choose another number 1, yeah – that film is seminal in every sense, I reckon.

      And no, not yet – I’ve always wanted to find ‘Avalon’ but it’s on my list, and I’d not come across ‘Red Spectacles’ before, off to go look into it now, thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Major props for Satoshi Kon, Akira, and Ghost in The Shell. Those are incredible choices for movies. I’m also glad Grave of the Fireflies and A Tree of Palme got some recognition. Man, I haven’t seen Endless Waltz in ages either!

    Liked by 1 person

    • They’re such classics, huh?

      I nearly had ‘Grave…’ in the actual list, because it’s doubtless better/more impactful than some of my top ten on certain levels but I’m still finding myself unable to revisit it to watch again. And yes! Despite the bits and pieces that I wasn’t fully onboard with for ‘A Tree of Palme’ it’s still such a great work and it stayed with me.

      Liked by 1 person

      • That’s certainly right.

        Definitely. Grave is such a powerful film on so many levels. I understand not wanting to rewatch it (I wouldn’t in this present time). Yeah, A Tree of Palme may have it’s issues, but that was still a brilliant movie that more anime fans should check out.

        Like

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